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Tiger Cathnid

Cathnid (\‘kath-nid\)

Size Nose to tail: 12 – 16 inches
Leg span: 24 – 36 inches
Weight 10 – 20 lbs
Habitat Forested lowlands and foothills of the Neidr river basin
Diet Small animals and birds ranging in size from mice up to raccoons, chickadees to ravens
Lifespan 10 years
Reproduction 1 – 3 young per clutch of eggs
Arach Effects Silk produces a strong soporific effect
Primary Uses Blankets and bedsheets that exude calm
Textiles that induce relaxation and trust

 A Captivating Web

When walking in our woods some springtime morning,
along the borders of the river Neidr,
you’ll notice hung on every branch, adorning,
the captivating web of cathnid spider.

That thought makes you a bellowing baboon,
eyes widening and throat constricting tighter?
You will not fear among these silk festoons,
the captivating web of cathnid spider.

The silk itself exudes a hushing calm
that soothes your fears and makes your worries quieter.
You’ll walk into its den without a qualm,
the captivating web of cathnid spider.

A Spidery Impression

The cathnid gives a spidery impression
with bulbous body, jointed leggy grace,
although its eyes will raise a feline question
while watching you amid its web of lace.

Adults can be three feet from tail to nose
with leg span twice that when they’re stretched in place,
though typically it stands on tippy-toes
while watching you amid its web of lace.

But where a spider’s hair is urticating,
a cathnid is in softest fur encased
and tempting you to pet the cathnid, waiting,
while watching you amid its web of lace.

They Need Connection

They weave the silk pulled from their spinnerets
and add it to their symbiotic hive
that’s hooked together in a single net.
They need connection if they are to thrive.

A cathnid separated from the group
too quickly sickens, withers up, and dies,
so don’t attempt to keep one in a coop—
they need connection if they are to thrive.

If one end of the web is set ablaze,
a hundred miles off the cathnids dive
for safety under nearby waters’ waves.
They need connection if they are to thrive.

Care Raising Young

They undertake to mate at tops of trees
and consequently there is little known,
but after? Eggs in ones and twos and threes.
Great care is taken raising cathnid young.

The cathnid mother weaves a silken sac
to hold her clutch and it is carried slung
in place of safety strapped upon her back.
Great care is taken raising cathnid young.

The hatchlings ride upon their mother’s rear,
with tiny claws among her fur they’re clung,
and leave her just when captive snack is near.
Great care is taken raising cathnid young.

But soon their legs grow long and then the kits
will join the cathnids close and those farflung.
Their fathers help them find their silken fit.
Great care is taken raising cathnid young.

Stubbornly Wild

A cathnid’s bite can pierce through hide or denim,
with toxin stronger than all medication
your heart will cease to beat. Beware its venom!
They stubbornly resist domestication.

Attempts to tame them are insanity.
The cathnid free and independent nation
remains untamed by close humanity.
They stubbornly resist domestication.

Our local guild of Harvestmen are shepherds
who mind and tend the wild population
while pointedly aware they’re merely stewards.
They stubbornly resist domestication.

Valuable Silk

The silk when raw is strongly soporific
but treated, carded, spun becomes a treasure:
a thread that’s gently calming and pacific.
The value of their silk cannot be measured.

And with its anesthetic properties
in proper dose that turn your pain to pleasure,
can from your agony provide relief.
The value of their silk cannot be measured.

But mostly textiles, fabrics, blankets, sheets,
are cottage industry, and rest assured
exporting silk is why our town can eat.
The value of their silk cannot be measured.